"The current market for electronic products depends on planned obsolescence: old products quickly become outdated and unfashionable. But extending the life of our electronic devices helps to address the e-waste problem. Project Cybersyn showed that it is possible to create a cutting-edge system using technologies that are not state-of-the-art. It demonstrates that the future can be tied to the technological past."
-- The Cybersyn Revolution (jacobinmag.com)


Next, the Internet: Building a Cooperative Digital Space

by Nathan Schneider(The Internet of Ownership)
Cooperatives brought electricity to rural America when no one else would, and they’ve given Main Street a fighting chance against the big boxes. They help millions buy homes. They pioneered the local, organic revival and the means of delivering fair-trade products from across the planet. Next, the internet. We have done this already, and we can do it again, even better than before.

Really nice article by @ntnsndr on the possibilities of coops in the digital space (and what they’re already achieving).  Quality rather than unnecessary growth; data privacy; federation rather than centralization; harnessing ideas like blockchain for trust; and funding new ventures through cooperative means. Exciting times. (h/t @Matt_Noyes)

I find Project Cybersyn fascinating as a piece of history of how one country tried to use advanced technology to solve the problem of socialist central planning.

Are there any good histories (or thought experiments) of the advanced use of technology for more anarchist, less hierarchical (non-market, non-state) organisation?

Also on:

Jeremy Corbyn pledges rebirth of 'municipal socialism' in the UK

(The Guardian)
Labour leader urges councils to reverse privatisation of public services while defending party’s intervention in Haringey

Interesting to see a reference to “municipal” socialism from JC. Also interesting to see the top-level intervention when a local authority is doing something dodgy. I agree with the sentiment of the intervention but how municipalist is it?