Been thinking lately that it could be a good municipal function to provide people with access to an ‘online home’, analogous to ensuring provision of physical homes.

In the same way it could be social, affordable, in a co-op, heck even (but hopefully not) private and rented. The municipality provides some infrastructure and codes/regulations to make sure there’s a home for everyone and that everyone can move freely if they want. But equally you can build your own home or move into an intentional community if you want and have the wherewithal to do so.

Not talking about a StateBook – if the state has any function in it, I think it should be regulating for open protocols and standards, or even just bare minimum access to data and data portability (newsocialist.org.uk/do-we-really-need-a-statebook/). I’m thinking more like Indienet – (indienet.info/) – the project in Ghent (coordinated by @aral@mastodon.ar.al) to provide each denizen with their own connected node in a wider p2p/federated network. I mean municipal more in the sense of libertarian municipalism, self-determination and federation of villages, towns, cities.

Obviously access to physical housing is a mess, at least where I’m currently living, so maybe not the best reference point. But I’m finding it an interesting framing. Every Facebook or Twitter profile is currently a home on the web, and it’s as if billions of people all have the same corrupt landlord.

This is kind of implicitly assuming that everyone *needs* a home on the web. That is certainly a debatable point. It is definitely becoming more of a part of the fabric of everyday life, and you could argue that it shouldn’t be.  I vacillate on this a bit but overall I tend to think that the benefits can outweigh the negatives, when it has a social motive and not a profit motive.

Much easier than regulating to break up Facebook, just regulate to force them to make an API for us to get data in and out. We can break them up ourselves once we have that.

They used to have one, and IndieWeb was doing pretty well with that until FB decided to turn it off. Now *that’s* monopolistic behaviour and anti-trust.

I just watched The Great Hack (documentary about Cambridge Analytica and the misuse of Facebook data).

It’s OK.  If you already know the story, there’s nothing much new.  I guess it’s good to keep the story alive, and maybe introduce it to people who missed it when it happened.  I found it a bit heavy handed, and the focus on Brittany Kaiser as an individual a bit distracting.  I guess it gives the story a hook though.

Moral of the story: don’t do data, kids.

Looking forward to reading this – “Future Histories” by Lizzie O’Shea

www.versobooks.com/books/2960-future-histories

“What, she asks, can the Paris Commune tell us about earlier experiments in sharing resources—like the Internet—in common? Can debates over digital access be guided by Tom Paine’s theories of democratic economic redistribution? And how is Elon Musk not a visionary but a throwback to Victorian-era utopians?”

Listened to a thing about the fourth industrial revolution, so called.  Driven by things like machine learning, AI, nano materials, biotech, additive manufacturing, sensors and IoT, autonomous vehicles.

I dunno.  I fail to be excited by any of it any more, unless it comes with an explicit intent to improve social wellbeing, not just vague promises of productivity and efficiency, shit going faster for the sake of it.

Replied to How to add webmentions to a Laravel powered blog (freek.dev)

The comment section of this blog used to be powered by Disqus. At its core, Disqus works pretty well. But I don’t like the fact that it pulls in a lot of JavaScript to make it work. It’s also not the prettiest UI. I’ve recently replaced Disqus comments with webmentions.

One of the nice things about webmentions is that I can like or reply to your post from my own site, too.  No Twitter required, and no character limit 🙂
Listening to SF 10-33 station on Soma FM.  “Ambient music mixed with the sounds of San Francisco public safety radio traffic.”

Very enjoyable. They play a lot of Loscil so I’m down with that.

There seemed to be a protest or march taking place earlier in San Francisco.

somafm.com/sf1033/

Listened to a summary of The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt.  It’s from 1951, but relevant today.  (“how quickly a democratic society can turn against its people”.)

What I took from this digest is how atomisation, isolation and disenfranchisement are fertile grounds for totalitarianism.  Without community and society you lose your sense of self and become easy prey for messages of totalitarianism.  Someone will come along and claim to represent you, and give an outlet for diesenfranchisement.

Once in a totalitarian society, people disengage from analytical and political thought.  The only thing that matters is the leader’s vision for the future.  Challenges to that vision are twisted to be from an enemy trying to mislead the public.

Listening to a thing about populism.  Interesting to delve into it.

In a nutshell: it’s a political strategy rather than an ideology, where the people’s interests are juxtaposed against a supposed elite.  It can have various host ideologies.  Personalist leaders claim to represent the people.  It’s hard to roll back populist attitudes once activated.

Had a great time at the Algorave at the Museum of Brands in Ladbroke Grove tonight.

I saw Digital Selves (with visuals from Rumblesan), Vou (+Rumblesan) and Miri Kat (with visuals from hellocatfood).  They all smashed it.

Digital Selves
Miri Kat / hellocatfood

The Museum of Brands also had a display of old radios.  Check out this beauty:

Solid State, aw yeah.  We had a radio that looked like this when I was growing up (although I think it must have been newer than this one.)

Liked Adversarial Interoperability by Ton Zijlstra

Adversarial Interoperability, a useful concept to keep in mind. In part the IndieWeb is a form of this, as it offers a way of staying outside walled gardens, while still being able to pass messages back and forth through its gates (i.e. API’s), through POSSE / sometimes PESOS. Though some platform…

Liked Renewable Matter Subscription by Ton Zijlstra

Took out a subscription to the Italian, English language, monthly Renewable Matter, on bio-economics and circular economy. Came across it earlier this week. As part of my open data work I am currently involved in a circular economy project focused on building a longterm oriented and wide ranging das…

I just spent a few days away in the Lake District.  It’s a beautiful part of England, and a great place to get away to relax and slow your pace down a bit.  Living in London at present, I notice that it takes a couple of days for me to properly unwind and appreciate the peace and quiet and nature on offer when coming to the Lakes.  Day 1 my head is usually wrapped up in something and I don’t fully appreciate my surroundings.  By day 3 or so I can happily just stare at a tree for 30 minutes or so (well maybe 15 minutes).  Usually at the moment however I also come back after three or four days.  It’d be good to spend a full week or two there and see what happens, or even go full Walden and spend a year there.

This time I did one big walk, hiking from Skelwith up to Swirl How in the Coniston set of fells.  It’s 2630 feet high, just 3 feet shorter than the Old Man of Coniston.  The walk there and back took about 7 hours.

The view from Swirl How down into the Greenburn valley. Wetherlam in the foreground to the right.

One of my favourite views that I’ve come across in the Lakes is en route to Little Langdale, looking through the Blea Tarn pass towards the Langdale Pikes.  This is a set of peaks rising from the Langdale Valley.  They have great names like Pike O’Blisco, Harrison Stickle, Sergeant Man, Pavey Ark, etc.

(Question: If you cross a stream near Harrison Stickle, is it a Harrison Ford?  Answer: yes. yes it is.)

Looking over towards the Langdale Pikes

We did a couple of shorter walks too.  One up the excellently named Iron Keld, leading towards Black Crag.  The signpost on the way is great – you have a choice of paths leading to either “Sunny Brow”, or “Iron Keld” and “Black Crag”.  It feels a  bit like choosing between Hobbiton and Mordor.  But for reference, Iron Keld is much more fun than Sunny Brow – it’s an old pine plantation.

The other short walk was up Loughrigg Fell, which joins Skelwith Bridge and Ambleside.   It’s a low fell but a beauty.  When you get near the top it is has lots of gentle undulations, lots of little paths to explore, and some great panoramic views – down towards Ambleside, over to Windermere, great views of Grasmere and Rydal Water.  This time of year it is covered in ferns and looks a little bit like Tellytubby Land in my opinion.

Top o’ Loughrigg

Loughrigg Tarn is a total beauty spot.  An idyllic smallish tarn on the south side of Loughrigg.  A good spot for taking a dog for a swim and looking over towards the Langdale Pikes from a different angle.  You get a good view down to it from the top of Loughrigg.

Loughrigg Tarn below

I can highly recommend a trip to the Lakes.