Replied to Vendor Lock In Through Your Domain Name by Ton Zijlstra

This is a somewhat worrying development: the entire .org registry of domain names has been sold to a private equity investor. That basically spells out just one way forward, extraction and rent-seeking. As this step immediately follows from ICANN lifting price increase caps in place earlier this yea…

It is a pernicious system of rent extraction, the domain registration system. I feel like after 16.5 years you should be entitled to true ownership, not subject to the whims of the entities that were privy to the original land grab.

Our non-profit has an org domain name, so we’ll have to evaluate the options. As you say, we have to decide whether we can let it go, even if we wanted to, as someone else might pick it up and leech off our reputation.

Replied to Inoreader introduceert Sort by Magic en Article Popularity Indicators – Inoreader blog by an author

Inoreader is een online leesapp voor je favoriete websites. Klinkt toch een stuk beter dan RSS-reader niet? Ik ben een fan van de app en betaal er jaarlijks graag voor. Vandaag komen ze met een nieuwe manier om je artikelen te sorteren voor je gaat lezen, Sort by Magic.
De sorteermethode is een comb…

That’s very interesting. I have been thinking recently about personal curation algorithms. The ‘purely chronological’ paradigm is overhyped I think, as a reaction to the big silos’ abuse of curation algorithms. If you control the algorithms, and have choice whether you use them or not, they’re a net positive I think. Sounds like inoreader gives you some flexibility, which is good. (Although calling it sort by ‘magic’ is a bad call I think. Algorithms should be transparent).
Replied to a post by Ton Zijlstra
That looked very intriguing – I’m looking forward to hearing your thoughts about it.

Using speculative fiction as a means for exploring alternative economies, and then engaging economists with it as a reality check, would make for some great conversations.

I enjoyed Four Futures by Peter Frase as something that looked at the overlap of sci-fi and possible economic futures.

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Really enjoyed this episode, thanks both.  Loads of great talking points.
Replied to 17 Years of Blogging by Ton Zijlstra

Today 17 years ago, at 14:07, I published my first blog post, and some 2000 followed since then. Previously I kept a website that archive.org traces back to early 1998, which was the second incarnation of a static website from 1997 (Demon Internet, my first ISP other than my university, entered the …

Happy bloggiversary 🎉

I’ve enjoyed reading your blog the past 6 months and have learned a lot from it. Here’s to the next twelve!

Replied to Indieweb Thoughts Post State of the Word by David ShanskeDavid Shanske

It has been a while since I wrote out some thoughts on where the Indieweb is on WordPress. Sitting here, after hearing Matt Mullenweg gave the State of the Word at WordCamp US, and after I assisting Tantek Çelik in his talk on Taking Back the Web, which was one of the contributing factors to my bei…

Thanks for all your work, David.

The WordPress IndieWeb ecosystem has enabled me to be a fully-fledged citizen of the IndieWeb. Everyone who has gotten it to where it is now is awesome! 🎉

Replied to Een commonplace book vind ik best lastig by Frank Meeuwsen

Een van mijn wensen die ik met dit blog heb, is om er meer een commonplace book van te maken. Een digitale plek waar ik halve gedachten kwijt kan, krabbels, een link naar een site die ik misschien een keer interessant genoeg vind om verder te bekijken. Notities, maar ook de meer traditionele blogpos…

I’m still thinking about this stuff too. I have just recently started a wiki(ish) digital commonplace book (commonplace.doubleloop.net) and it has certainly helped me to think of it as for me only (even though it is public).

Despite the naming I am not yet 100% sure about the relationship between my blog and my wiki. They are just loosely defined in my head at the moment as both simply me hypertexting to help me think. The actuality of what I post where and when (and why) is still a bit fluid.

At first I saw the blog as being the more ephemeral of the two, the stream of consciousness, and the wiki being where thoughts go when they are fully baked. But that has not been entirely the case so far. Some things I will actually write first in my wiki, completely undercooked, and shortly afterwards post to my blog timeline once I’ve thought it through a bit more in (almost) privacy.

At the moment I think I see the wiki as being ‘the bits that I want to keep’ long-term, and the blog as being ‘the thoughts that I want to share’ in the here and now. I might piece some thoughts together on the wiki, then share them via the blog for interaction, and then polish up the thoughts on the wiki based on what I’ve learned. For me (at the moment) the blog is social and interactive, the wiki is (publicly…) private and introspective.

The main technical distinction at the moment is that I *expect* to edit the text on the wiki, whereas I generally never go back and edit things I’ve posted to my blog timeline. (And in fact, I’m thinking about also automatically making timeline posts older than X months become private).

Maybe I should think of them *both* as my commonplace book, taken together.

Thanks for posting your thoughts, Frank, it made me think about some of mine.  In case you haven’t seen it, Kicks’ post on hypertexting is very good – www.kickscondor.com/hypertexting/. And Ton has some great thoughts on it of course (www.zylstra.org/blog/2019/06/the-blog-and-wiki-combo/) 🙂

Replied to a post by Panda MeryPanda Mery

Do you know the Shadoks and the Gibi? Here’s an article mentioning the Twittering Machine as well: thequietus.com/articles/25112-les-shadoks-jacques-rouxel-shadokorama-jacques-rouxel-et-les-shadoks-chateau-dannecy-review

I didn’t know about Les Shadoks, thanks!  I watched and enjoyed the clip in the article you linked.  Seems like a very interesting cartoon – politics, philosophy, musique concrete…
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Uh oh.. an outbreak of PHP warnings.. prognosis not good.

On a positive, at OggCamp some associated with @theastralship was very into geodesic domes. I think the spirit lives on in many forms!

Replied to How do I POSSE to Mastodon now? by an author

This is what I’m running into to try to make new Indieweb technology as simple to explain as possible. Ryan Barrett did some amazing work and made it possible to connect your own Mastodon account to your site. So you can get likes and replies from Mastodon in the comments of your own site. But you…

I wonder if it posted just the title and the link as it recognised this post as an article type (you can see objectType: article in the logs).

If you were to create a note then it would post the full content of the note as a toot, I think.

Replied to How do I POSSE to Mastodon now? by an author

This is what I’m running into to try to make new Indieweb technology as simple to explain as possible. Ryan Barrett did some amazing work and made it possible to connect your own Mastodon account to your site. So you can get likes and replies from Mastodon in the comments of your own site. But you…

The way I tested it is as you described – by adding the brid.gy/publish/mastodon link as a custom provider in Syndication Links.

My own test post wasn’t great though – it included the link back to my site (even though I have it set not to in Syndication Links), and also included the text ‘Also on’.

When I get chance I will test it further, and maybe write a blog post revisiting all the different IndieWeb to Mastodon options!

Replied to Mastodon on Bridgy by Ryan BarrettRyan Barrett

https://snarfed.org/mastodon_elephant_curious.png https://snarfed.org/mastodon_elephant_curious.png
Mastodon is now on Bridgy! Both backfeed and publish (aka POSSE) are fully supported. Feel free to try them out! And let me know if you hit any bugs, problems, or missing features.
(If you’re alread…

Woah, nice! 🎉
Replied to On Panic Attacks by Jamie TannaJamie Tanna

Remembering my first (and so far only) panic attack.

Thanks for posting this. I completely agree that talking about mental health issues in the open is really helpful to remove some of the stigma associated. It can be a bit scary, but the more people do it, the more normalised it will be. I posted about my social anxiety a while back.
Replied to a post by Flophouse_SamFlophouse_Sam
I haven’t used it, but /e/ seems like a great idea. It makes degoogling a lot simpler than doing it yourself on an existing phone. The phones are refurbished, which is good environmentally.  It provides services to replace some of those you’d miss from degoogling. Also Gael Duval the founder is on the Fediverse 😉 @gael
Replied to a post by Ton Zijlstra

Anil Dash reflects on two decades of blogging.
Some quotes that resonate:
I also do still strongly believe that someone who really has a strong point of view, and substantive insights into their area of interest, can have huge impact just by consistently blogging about that topic. It’s not current…

Your blog is a motivation for me Ton, to try to blog regularly – to build of a body of work. I really like how you are able to reference back to previous thoughts on a topic to add context to a new post.

"Even if you don’t have ‘substantive insights’ in your areas of interest but still consistently blog, there will be impact."

This really resonates with me – I feel like the more I blog, the more my thoughts have substance.

Replied to How to add webmentions to a Laravel powered blog (freek.dev)

The comment section of this blog used to be powered by Disqus. At its core, Disqus works pretty well. But I don’t like the fact that it pulls in a lot of JavaScript to make it work. It’s also not the prettiest UI. I’ve recently replaced Disqus comments with webmentions.

One of the nice things about webmentions is that I can like or reply to your post from my own site, too.  No Twitter required, and no character limit 🙂
Replied to a post by VanessaVanessa
I love kingfishers! A couple of years back I saw a kingfisher on the Leeds-Liverpool canal – a complete bolt out of the blue, it flew into a tree, perched there for a little bit, then swooped down into the canal, caught a fish, and then flew away again – it was stunning.
Replied to a post by Ton Zijlstra

I guess the novelty will wear off after a year, but for now my ‘on this day’ widget keeps surfacing small fun finds in my blog archive. Fifteen years ago today I installed our first wifi at home. Twelve years ago today I hurt myself playing Wii-Tennis.
Looking back at my own archives day by day …

Those are some fun memories 🙂 I like that secondary use of an ‘on this day’ widget – as part of the weeding and watering of one’s blog. I have a ‘random post’ page that I occasionally use and aim to use more – partly to surface old memories, but also it works as a small microtask for myself – did I tag and categorise the post? Does it have the right post kind? And maybe more interestingly, how have my thoughts changed over time – is it time to write a new post on the topic?
Replied to Blogging {:} a Life by Ton Zijlstra

My friend Peter has been blogging for exactly 20 years yesterday. His blog is a real commonplace book, and way more than my blog, an eclectic mixture of personal things, professional interests, and the rhythm of life of his hometown. When you keep that up for long enough, decades even, it stops bein…

This is really nice. I’m still trying to pin down what it is that I actually want from the nebulous world of ‘social media’, and I think that this very human part of it, with lifelong friendships around the world, must be a big part of it.
Replied to Taking e-mail back, one user account at a time by Ton Zijlstra

Today I changed the way we use e-mail addresses for identification on-line.

Thanks for this writeup, Ton.  I have been using a gmail account as the firewall between the world and my real email account, but this looks like it could be even better.  I’m not particularly happy with some of my mail going through Gmail, even if it’s just for the more disposable accounts.
Replied to a post by Ton Zijlstra

Can Granary.io also turn Twitter #topic streams into a feed? I seem to only see examples of personal twitter timeline—>feed. I never look at my timeline really, mostly have #topic columns alerts in my Tweetdeck columns e.g

You can, yes. Your link will be something like:

granary.io/twitter/@me/thetopic/@app/?format=html&access_token_key=thetoken&access_token_secret=thesecret

I used to follow individual accounts from Twitter using granary (doubleloop.net/2019/03/12/following-twitter-peeps-in-an-indiereader-with-granary-io-and-microsub/), however I realised from discussion with Ryan (snarfed.org, who makes granary.io) that doing that puts unnecessary load on granary and your microsub server. However, doing it via twitter ‘lists’ is OK.

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Hubzilla ticks a few of these boxes (zotlabs.org/help/en-gb/about/about#What_is_Hubzilla_)

I don’t think it has iOS support though sadly!