Replied to a post by Ton Zijlstra

Anil Dash reflects on two decades of blogging.
Some quotes that resonate:
I also do still strongly believe that someone who really has a strong point of view, and substantive insights into their area of interest, can have huge impact just by consistently blogging about that topic. It’s not current…

Your blog is a motivation for me Ton, to try to blog regularly – to build of a body of work. I really like how you are able to reference back to previous thoughts on a topic to add context to a new post.

"Even if you don’t have ‘substantive insights’ in your areas of interest but still consistently blog, there will be impact."

This really resonates with me – I feel like the more I blog, the more my thoughts have substance.

Replied to How to add webmentions to a Laravel powered blog (freek.dev)

The comment section of this blog used to be powered by Disqus. At its core, Disqus works pretty well. But I don’t like the fact that it pulls in a lot of JavaScript to make it work. It’s also not the prettiest UI. I’ve recently replaced Disqus comments with webmentions.

One of the nice things about webmentions is that I can like or reply to your post from my own site, too.  No Twitter required, and no character limit 🙂
Replied to a post by VanessaVanessa
I love kingfishers! A couple of years back I saw a kingfisher on the Leeds-Liverpool canal – a complete bolt out of the blue, it flew into a tree, perched there for a little bit, then swooped down into the canal, caught a fish, and then flew away again – it was stunning.
Replied to a post by Ton Zijlstra

I guess the novelty will wear off after a year, but for now my ‘on this day’ widget keeps surfacing small fun finds in my blog archive. Fifteen years ago today I installed our first wifi at home. Twelve years ago today I hurt myself playing Wii-Tennis.
Looking back at my own archives day by day …

Those are some fun memories 🙂 I like that secondary use of an ‘on this day’ widget – as part of the weeding and watering of one’s blog. I have a ‘random post’ page that I occasionally use and aim to use more – partly to surface old memories, but also it works as a small microtask for myself – did I tag and categorise the post? Does it have the right post kind? And maybe more interestingly, how have my thoughts changed over time – is it time to write a new post on the topic?
Replied to Blogging {:} a Life by Ton Zijlstra

My friend Peter has been blogging for exactly 20 years yesterday. His blog is a real commonplace book, and way more than my blog, an eclectic mixture of personal things, professional interests, and the rhythm of life of his hometown. When you keep that up for long enough, decades even, it stops bein…

This is really nice. I’m still trying to pin down what it is that I actually want from the nebulous world of ‘social media’, and I think that this very human part of it, with lifelong friendships around the world, must be a big part of it.
Replied to Taking e-mail back, one user account at a time by Ton Zijlstra

Today I changed the way we use e-mail addresses for identification on-line.

Thanks for this writeup, Ton.  I have been using a gmail account as the firewall between the world and my real email account, but this looks like it could be even better.  I’m not particularly happy with some of my mail going through Gmail, even if it’s just for the more disposable accounts.
Replied to a post by Ton Zijlstra

Can Granary.io also turn Twitter #topic streams into a feed? I seem to only see examples of personal twitter timeline—>feed. I never look at my timeline really, mostly have #topic columns alerts in my Tweetdeck columns e.g

You can, yes. Your link will be something like:

granary.io/twitter/@me/thetopic/@app/?format=html&access_token_key=thetoken&access_token_secret=thesecret

I used to follow individual accounts from Twitter using granary (doubleloop.net/2019/03/12/following-twitter-peeps-in-an-indiereader-with-granary-io-and-microsub/), however I realised from discussion with Ryan (snarfed.org, who makes granary.io) that doing that puts unnecessary load on granary and your microsub server. However, doing it via twitter ‘lists’ is OK.

Replied to

Hubzilla ticks a few of these boxes (zotlabs.org/help/en-gb/about/about#What_is_Hubzilla_)

I don’t think it has iOS support though sadly!

Replied to a post by Doug WebbDoug Webb

One of the core ‘demands’ of #ExtinctionRebellion is to set up a #CitizensAssembly. This is not a new concept: #sortition has been around since Athens.
I find a lot of people worried about trusting ‘normal people’ to make big decisions. I would love to have a CA as one of the major political bodies….

I am all for the idea of more direct civic participation in society and the removal of an elite governing class. I can see why not having ‘expert’ knowledge would be a thorny issue tho. I wouldn’t see it as not trusting normal people, just a recognition that a lot of issues require in-depth knowledge. I presently wouldn’t trust myself to make a suitably informed decision on many complex issues outside my area of knowledge.

That said, it works for juries, and if there was a strong civil service and adequate time for researching important decisions, I’m sure it could work.

I don’t know much about the details of sortition – would love to hear more of your views.

Replied to a post by zypper rm bourgeoisie --forcezypper rm bourgeoisie –force

@tobi it’s can’t replace the ability to interact with and post content, but can replace Facebook etc as a content feed from all your preferred sources.
I’ve got mine setup with subscriptions to news, blogs, YouTube, this day in history etc. All without having to log in, see ads(there are some in You…

The Indieweb approach and social readers[1] such as Monocle[2], Together[3], and Indigenous on mobile[4] combine posting and social interactions with feed reading. It’s super cool!

[1] aaronparecki.com/2018/04/20/46/indieweb-reader-my-new-home-on-the-internet​
[2] indieweb.org/Monocle​
[3] indieweb.org/Together​
[4] indigenous.abode.pub/android/​

Replied to Festive indieweb and selfhosting by voss voss

Holiday is on, and apart from relaxing with the family, I aim to look into a bunch of stuff before I’m back at the factory in January.
My Indieweb life is coming on well, thanks to Known, and the community in London. I attended my first couple of Homebrew Website Club meetups in town in 20…

Sounds like a plan to me – I do that sometimes – just spin up a $5/month VPS with Digital Ocean, play around with something, then tear it down again if it doesn’t work out (or keep it if it does!)

Good luck with the projects — look forward to hearing how they go. 🙂

Replied to Automated Testing for the Indie Web? by Johannes Ernst

(This post is mostly for Indie Web geeks. Feel free to ignore) The problem We spend too much time debugging why things didn’t work as expected Not so much Gen 1 people running their own, custom-developed software, but later-gen people who try to, say, make WordPress work with a previously unseen c…

We had a small session on testing at IndieWebCamp Berlin 2017 – indieweb.org/2017/Berlin/testing

I also did a bit of automating stuff and hacking on it during the hack day: doubleloop.net/2017/11/14/indiewebcamp-berlin-day-2/

Replied to The Preserve of IRL by an author
I have definitely had personal conversations online, as in private and intimate, but I think I have never really had a similar experience as a long and rambling conversation like that sitting on a sofa until 1 in the morning, sharing random thoughts. Or a chat like that experienced on a hike through the woods.

But maybe that is fine! And to be expected. I guess maybe online and offline are just different modalities, maybe not better or worse. I liked your use of the word ‘revery’ – I think online it is hard to recreate a dialogue of fanciful musing, full of pauses, comical stumblings, dead ends, half-baked facts, but ultimately a fun and shared progression towards something. At least for me, online conversation has (thus far at least…) been much more precise, fact-based, rigorous. I possibly learn more, but it is less fun.

Replied to Personal and Human by an author
Thanks for posting this – I feel like sometimes too my online presence has become something of a link aggregator or a fact exchanger, less of a rambling human conversationalist. Could be that it’s the preserve of IRL? But I totally back trying to bring back revery and musing.
Replied to Discovery Test #1 by Webmention Rocks!Webmention Rocks!

This post advertises its Webmention endpoint with an HTTP Link header. The URL is relative, so this will also test whether your discovery code properly resolves the relative URL.

We’re acquainted with the wormhole phenomenon, but this… Is a remarkable piece of bio-electronic engineering by which I see much of the EM spectrum ranging from heat and infrared through radio waves, et cetera, and forgive me if I’ve said and listened to this a thousand times. This planet’s interior heat provides an abundance of geothermal energy. We need to neutralize the homing signal…
Replied to a post by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich

Replied to Support for importing syndication links for Mastodon Autopost · Issue #75 · dshanske/syndication-links by Chris Aldrich (GitHub)Now that SL has the Mastodon icon (#66), I’ll also note that the latest version of Mastodon Autopost plugin should now also support importing the URL for the l…

How did you get this to work Chris?
Replied to A post by mooncakemooncake (ACP 🎉🍰)

One of the things I love about The Dispossessed is that LeGuin doesn’t pretend that once anarchist society is established it’s all roses and freedom and happiness because she jumps right into all the contradictions of living in a society conceived of as a revolution and keeps on interrogating that. It’s great! Even the bits at the end that are heartbreaking but also familiar because, yeah, we’ve all dealt with that even in the spokescouncil model blah blah blah bleep bloop

Yeah it was great for that. Also challenging lots of preconceptions. In many places my first reaction was ‘hmm not sure I like the sound of that..’ Like the dormitories, the absent parenting, the kids just being assigned a name. And then over time I’d start thinking ‘wait, exactly why don’t I like that idea?’ Like is there objectively something wrong with it or just because of the particular cultural hegemony I’ve grown up in.

Which contradictions were you thinking of?