Replied to Notes: We’ve Got Blog (2002) by Kicks Condor (Kicks Condor)

What are blogs for? A trip to the beginning. The halcyon days of dot-com idealism and sheer shit-talking.

This is a great retrospective, thanks! I enjoyed reading it and your notes. (Lol’ed at linkslut).

I’m kind of OK with the sentiment of the p.14 quote from Rebecca Blood – hypertexting helping me find my voice – although yeah it is worded a little like something from a Victorian self-help guide. But I have found blogging and wiki-ing sort of does the things she says. Though I think I would perhaps just describe it as learning, rather than self-growth. The blog/wiki combo is both helping me think more about what I learn *and* learn more about what I think, I’m really digging it.

“h0p3 has a home page entry point that is carefully curated and groomed, but which is several layers up from a complete chaos of link dumps, raw drafts and random introspections […] These layers run a spectrum of accessibility—there is always a learning curve before you hit the bottom. You start with a doorway before entering a maze.”

I’ve noticed my own wiki/commonplace book thingy slowly taking that rough form recently, too, I wonder if it’s a common pattern? I’ve just started making the doorframe.

2 thoughts on “

  1. Cool – I appreciate this clarifying thought. My issue was more with the part
    about solidifying opinions – I think my personality needs my opinions to be
    plastic. But maybe that fights against self-growth. Like maybe learning should
    solidify into opinions…? I really love her contributions to that book
    tho – in case it wasn’t clear.
    (I’m reading her The Weblog Handbook (2002) right now as well – will probably post
    some thoughts on it.)

    I’ve noticed my own wiki/commonplace book thingy slowly taking that rough form
    recently, too, I wonder if it’s a common pattern? I’ve just started making the
    doorframe.

    Huh – well it definitely appears to be a pattern. (Interesting to see @visakanv
    do this with Twitter threads – as if
    it was his commonplace book.) I don’t think it’s terribly common – but perhaps
    becoming more so in our niche.

    via kickscondor.com

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