"Since the dawn of the neoliberal period in the 1980s, however, public land has been subject to privatisation on a massive scale. In his recent book The New Enclosure, Brett Christophers found that a staggering 10% of Britain’s total landmass has been privatised during this period, equivalent to land worth £400 billion."

A lot of Manchester’s public land is turning into privately-owned unaffordable luxury flats.

https://tribunemag.co.uk/2021/05/the-privatisation-of-manchester/

I’ve got RSS-Bridge set up to pick up RSS feeds from Facebook pages now. I subscribe to them in Aperture and can read them in my a social reader e.g. Indigenous. That, combined with some Twitter feeds coming from Twitter Atom, is letting me keep up with what’s going on locally pretty well so far.
Pretty excited to be reading in Free, Fair and Alive about the links they make between complexity science and the Commons.

I studied Evolutionary and adaptive systems way back when, and its nice when various themes of my life link together.

This is a great article in @compost on the role of the client-server model in the enclosure of the digital commons, and how peer-to-peer can punch some cracks in the big tech pavement.

one.compost.digital/seeding-th

I think there’s some space for reflection on the other aspect of the article, the use of nature analogies for technological concepts. I like them (e.g. digital garden) but I think need to think about what they might hide or distort, too.