RSVPed Attending Race & The New Economy: STIR Magazine Winter Launch
Marginalised workers and particularly those within Black, Asian and Latino communities, are most likely to fall into precarious work and the first to be left behind by the rise of automation and the gig-economy. We’ll be asking: “Can current projects that aim to work as alternatives to neoliberalism also work for racial justice? And how can we mitigate the racialised impact of the precarious work through the way we organise?”

In case it helps anyone, here are the steps I needed to take to get geben working in spacemacs in order to debug local web apps (this in Ubuntu 16.04):

  • Add geben package to .spacemacs and reload
 dotspacemacs-additional-packages '(some-other-package geben)

  • Assuming you have xdebug installed, add the following to your php.ini file in /etc/php/7.1/apache2/php.ini
[xdebug]

xdebug.remote_enable=On

xdebug.remote_host=localhost

xdebug.idekey=geben

xdebug.remote_autostart=On
  • Open the file you’re interested in debugging
  • Start geben in spacemacs with M-x geben
  • Navigate to localhost/some-app.php in a browser

That should trigger geben. Debugging time!

A bonus note: I didn’t have any luck with geben-find-file when trying to add breakpoints to other files in the project, but using geben-open-file worked (just a little bit more cumbersome.)

We need to figure out (or someone needs to introduce me to..) a good alternative to Facebook Events ASAP.  I briefly reactivated my account (because reasons) and stumbled across a public lecture about Thomas Sankara, and an event put on by the Chilean embassy about Project Cybersyn.  And it’s an absolute crime that Facebook is the only way to discover these.

Just signed up for Berlin Marathon in September 2018. Really excited. Not so much for the challenge, I’m not a big believer in the whole personal ‘individual’ challenge thing. It’s more I recognise the huge positive link between regular exercise and my mental health, and past evidence shows I need a big looming event to make me get out regularly. (And well plus – Berlin is awesome.)

Hope I can find some training buddies.

Fascinating sprawling discussion on counter anti-disintermediation, decentralized social media, decentralized infrastructure, politics of coops, mesh networking.

https://social.coop/web/statuses/99324980275573606

Two thoughts spring to mind:

  • Mastodon isn’t great for reading a threaded discussion
  • Seems a shame all this great discourse is destined to just eventually slide off a timeline, what’s to be done about that?

The First Things First manifesto from 1964.  Graphic designers advocating for a use of their trade that has more benefit to the social good.

“In common with an increasing number of the general public, we have reached a saturation point at which the high pitched scream of consumer selling is no more than sheer noise.”

Just to repeat, that’s over 50 years ago. It sure as hell hasn’t gotten any better.

Finding a replacement laptop battery is not an easy task. Most retailers get 1 out of 5, ‘do not buy!!!’ reviews on trustpilot. The best one selling my part averages 3 out of 5, with reviews like ‘first one I received was faulty, but customer service was OK and they sent out one that worked.’ Doesn’t inspire confidence. Oh well, time to gamble £30…

Liked Phew, that was hard! Finally have a Huginn workflow for syndicating Mastodon favs and boosts back to my personal site, from where I post (using #IndieWeb #webmentions).Here's the scenario diagram: (blog post and Huginn gems coming soon). by Sebastian KippeSebastian Kippe (updates.kip.pe)
Phew, that was hard! Finally have a Huginn workflow for syndicating Mastodon favs and boosts back to my personal site, from where I post (using #IndieWeb #webmentions). Here's the scenario diagram: https://storage.5apps.com/basti/public/shares/180111-1545-mastodon-webmentions.png (blog post and H...

At HWC London tonight, I worked on a small thing – figuring out why my avatar was appearing blurry when pulled in to other sites following a webmention I’ve sent to them.

For example, on this like of one of Chris’ posts at boffosocko.com:

There’s me at the bottom left, cheerfully blurry.

I wasn’t quite sure why, because the h-card I added into my WordPress theme links to a profile image on my site that is 654×654.

Looking at this with Calum we saw that I have multiple h-cards appearing on any given page, and (other than the one I’ve hard coded) they all point to my image on Gravatar.  Not only that, they are specifically pulling out a 40px square version of my gravatar.

With a little inspection it turns out that every post on my site has a h-card embedded in it.  It’s in the post footer that is added to each post, like this:So the bit that says ‘by’ and my name, also includes h-card microformats.  And in that h-card markup, the image source is my gravatar image, at size 40px.

I wasn’t sure if having an h-card in every single post even made sense, but a bit of discussion with Barry helped me to understand the places you might have the h-card, and that while there’s various ways of doing it, an explicit h-card per post is certainly fine.  Barry pointed me to the authorship page on the wiki for more details on this.

OK, so where does the h-card per post come from in my site?  Given that it contains microformats, and I don’t think WordPress has much microformats built in, the most likely candidate is for it to be somewhere in my fork of the Sempress theme.

A quick search for h-card in the code of my theme for h-card shows yup, that’s where that post footer is being rendered.  It’s in the sempress_posted_on function – there’s a call to get_avatar, a built-in WordPress function.  In that call, the argument for the desired avatar size is being passed in as 40.

So I’ve bumped that up to 96, and all should now be well.

 

 

Read Paradigm shifts for the decentralized Web (ruben.verborgh.org)
As separate markets for data and apps emerge, Web development needs to adopt a new shape ◆ Most Web applications today follow the adage “your data for my services”. They motivate this deal from both a technical perspective (how could we provide services without your data?

Interesting article on the Solid (Social linked data) platform.  It describes a lot of the decentralisation concepts that are explored and implemented in the indieweb movement (surprised the article doesn’t mention indieweb, in fact, given the W3C link), but comes at it from a Linked Data angle.  The language around markets and competition doesn’t really appeal to my personal politics, but good to see the philosophy of moving away from centralised silos being explored in different ways.

Rather than sexual relationships and reproductive organs, humbly suggesting the use of more genuinely offensive phrases for times of anger, e.g.

– you’re a total archon
– what an utter sultan
– oh put a crown on
– why don’t you go and abdicate you absolute monarch

etc

Aid payments are dwarfed by what’s lost to spurious debts, profit extraction, and dodgy invoicing, but help to feed a narrative of the industriousness and benevolence of developed countries.

“What this means is that the usual development narrative has it backwards. Aid is effectively flowing in reverse. Rich countries aren’t developing poor countries; poor countries are developing rich ones.”

In other words, for every $1 of aid that developing countries receive, they lose $24 in net outflows

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2017/jan/14/aid-in-reverse-how-poor-countries-develop-rich-countries

Quoted Flying Blind (Logic Magazine)
Techno-utopianism isn’t the answer, in other words. Neither is techno-dystopianism. The internet once embodied our hopes for a harmonious future. Now it offers a convenient punching bag for our despair about the present. But technology doesn’t automatically generate justice or injustice. The outcomes it generates depend on who owns the machines, and how they’re engineered. Utopia may never arrive. But technology can make the world more just—if we find the right ways to organize and operate it.

Right on.

A bit disappointed that Mozilla’s Pocket acquisition doesn’t seem to have resulted in much other than bundling it into the browser. Still closed, still a centralised silo. Currently looking at Wallabag and PressForward in WordPress as alternatives.

So I’m creating a password for a gov.uk account. I’m not allowed to have any special characters in my password, letters and numbers only. Adding a special character fails validation and tells me that my password is not secure.

gov.uk is usually regarded as excellent on UX, so what’s the deal here? Is there some logic to it?